For a full summary of the summit please check back. For a full gallery of photos click HERE.

The Summit

Inaugural Chican/o Latina/o

Printmaking Summit

Self Help Graphics & Art in partnership with the Eastside Arts Initiative and the University of Texas at San Antonio is convening the Inaugural Chican/o Latina/o Printmaking Summit on February 20 – 26, 2017, in Los Angeles with the goals of discussing the following:

  • Master Printer role within community centered printmaking studios/spaces.
  • Develop a template (pathway) for future Master Printers.
  • Discuss and develop a larger national printmaking summit for 2018-2019.
  • Provide workshops to the local community of printmakers.
  • Creation of a fine art print portfolio documenting this gathering.

 

The Chicana/o Latina/o printmaking community has recently lost powerful figures and Maestros such as Richard Duardo, Sam Baray, Fernando Salicrup, and Sam Coronado. Their departure leaves a large void, and we hope this gathering can establish a national pipeline for master printers and foster the knowledge and relationships that these artists provided our communities.

At Self Help Graphics & Art, we understand and value the role of the Master Printer in creating a trusting and nurturing environment that can develop important relationships between the printer and artists. Master Printers guide artists from the conceptual stage to the completion of a print edition, by providing expertise and strategies, producing something that is reflective of the artist’s initial vision.

Secondly, this initiative will strengthen printmaking here in East Los Angeles by exposing artists to Master Printers and master printmakers; building stronger networks between our studios and spaces and inspire collaborations; sparking new dialogues and more importantly enriching our network; and pooling together knowledge on sustainable practices.

Lastly, this gathering will serve to plan a larger national summit of Chicana/o Latina/o printmakers with associated professional development opportunities and printmaking workshops for artists.

This summit will convene master printers, printmakers, printmaking centers and artists from across the nation to discuss and plan ways in which we can continue this printmaking legacy, much of which was sparked here in on the eastside through SHG, Modern Multiples, Centro de Arte Publico, Mechicano Art Center, and other printmaking efforts that have resulted in landmark collections such as Estampas de la Raza from the Romo Collection. This we hope can create a pathway for new generations of artists that can continue bringing to light important issues through the printmaking medium.

INVITED MASTER PRINTERS

Born and raised in the Dominican Republic. He is a resident teaching artist at the Hudson River Museum in New York and has been a visiting artist at SHG.

Coronado’s work is housed in permanent collections of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, Rutgers Archives for Printmaking Studios, Lauinger Memorial Library of Rare Books and Prints Collection, Library of Congress, Federal Board of Governors Art Collection, District of Columbia Government: Arts and Humanities Commission, El Paso Museum of Art, among others.

Born in Queens, New York and raised in Quito, Ecuador. She received both her MA and MFA in 1992 and 1995, respectively, from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Her work is represented in the Smithsonian American Art Museum, The San Antonio Museum of Art, Mexic-Arte Museum, Art Museum of South Texas, The Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection, and Gilbert Cárdenas Latino Art Collection, and Casa de la Cultura in Quito, Ecuador, the Biblioteque Nationale in Paris, and the Kohler Art Library.

Malaquías Montoya is an American born Chicano poster artist and a major figure in the Chicano Art Movement of the 1960s and 1970s.

Montoya founded the Mexican-American Liberation Art Front and was “arguably the most influential Chicano artist collective in the movement.” Since 1989 Montoya has held a professorship at the University of California, Davis, teaching both in the Department of Art and the Department of Chicana/o Studies. He is founder of a community art center in Woodland, CA that works with at-risk youth.

Rogelio Gutierrez is an interdisciplinary artist and educator whose work deals with his experiences as a first generation Mexican-American.

Rogelio has been part of numerous group and solo exhibitions in the U.S. and abroad. He is the recipient of the 2014-2015 Herberger Institute School of Arts’ Endowed Professor of Art Award for his contribution to teaching excellence, as well as for his innovative creative activities that extend beyond the boundaries of the School. Rogelio currently teaches at Arizona State University.

PROGRAM | February 20 - 26, 2017

SESSIONS at 9AM – 3PM, LUNCH at 12PM:

  • The Master Printer, A Collective Pathway
  • Diversity and Inclusion
  • Sustainable Printmaking Practices
  • Reviving Printmaking at Universities and Colleges

EVENING (5PM to 8PM) WORKSHOPS Facilitated by:

  • Pepe Coronado (Coronado Print Studio, NYC)
  • Sandra C. Fernandez (Printmaking Center of New Jersey)
  • Rogelio Gutierrez (Arizona State University)
  • Malaquias Montoya (Taller Arte Del Nuevo Amanecer TANA)
  • Juan Mora (University of Texas at San Antonio)
  • Humberto Saenz (University of Texas at San Antonio)
    additional workshops to be announced

  • René Hugo Arceo (Arceo Press, Chicago, Illinois)
  • California State University, Long Beach (Printmaking Department)
  • Melanie Cervantes (Dignidad Rebelde)
  • Poli Marichal (Los de Abajo Printmaking Collective, SHG Artist Roundtable)
  • John Miner (Pasadena City College)
  • Dr. Ricardo Romo (University of Texas at San Antonio)
  • Dewey Tafoya (SHG, Artist in Residence, Printmaking Committee)
    additional printmakers to be announced

Twenty-five Original Print Editions by Latino and Latina Artists Printed at The University of Texas at San Antonio
Curated by President Ricardo Romo, Arturo Infante Almeida, and Kent Rush

Ten years in the making, the 25Veinticinco exhibition includes prints by 25 Latino/a artists who worked in collaboration with master printers Neal Cox and Steven Carter in the print studio at the UTSA Department of Art and Art History.

“‘Veinticinco,’” said UTSA President Ricardo Romo, “treats viewers to an exploration of important Latino themes related to labor, immigration, gender and poverty. In addition, several of the works allow us a glimpse into significant traditions and cultural values in our society.”

“There is something magical and synergistic that happens when a creative artist works with an innovative and professional printer,” Rush said. “This series of 25 prints is ultimately a tribute to the vitality of the region’s Latino art scene. The cross section covers established artists, mid-career artists and a sampling of new and emerging artists. The variety of imagery, styles, and concepts is extremely diverse and dynamic.”


Contemporary Mexican Printmaking on Both Sides of the Border

Throughout history, printmaking has acted as a cooperative and democratic art form. Mexican printmaking, in particular, has a rich tradition of providing a vehicle for social reform that has influenced generations of artists from around the world. From El Taller de Gráfica Popular to the DIY printshops of today, this tradition continues. The contemporary Mexican printmaking scene is vibrant and vast, both in the U.S. and Mexico.

This portfolio features contemporary Mexican printmakers from both the U.S and Mexico. The exchange will unite artists that have similar cultural backgrounds despite efforts made by politicians that aim to stratify populations. These prints not only reflect issues concerning today’s Mexican/Mexican-American, but also shed light on border issues, the ever-changing face of this nation, and the relationship we have with neighboring Mexico. This eclectic group of artists is comprised of traditional, non-traditional, academic, and DIY printmakers. There is a rich history of Mexican printmaking and this portfolio exchange will evidence that this tradition continues to evolve on both sides of the border.

SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2017

CHECK-IN: 8:30AM

SESSION #1: 9am – 4pm (12pm lunch break)
The Master Printer, A Collective Pathway

EXHIBITION WALK THROUGH: 5pm – 8pm
Ni De Aqui, Ni De Alla
with curator Rogelio Gutierrez

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2017

CHECK-IN: 8:30AM

SESSION #2: 9am – 4pm (12pm lunch break)
Sustainable Printmaking Practices

WORKSHOP: 5pm – 8pm (Requires RSVP)
Woodblock Printmaking Workshop
with Master Printer Humberto Saenz

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2017

CHECK-IN: 8:30AM

SESSION #3: 9am – 4pm (12pm lunch break)
Diversity and Inclusion

WORKSHOP: 5pm – 8pm (Requires RSVP)
Experimental Screenprinting Workshop
with Master Printer Pepe Coronado

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2017

CHECK-IN: 8:30AM

WORKSHOP: 9am – 12pm (Requires RSVP)
Experimental Monoprinting/Etching Workshop
with Master Printer Sandra Fernandez

WORKSHOP: 1pm – 4pm (Requires RSVP)
Linocut Relief Printmaking Workshop
with Master Printer Juan de Dios Mora

SESSION #4: 5pm – 8pm 
Reviving Printmaking at Universities and Colleges

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2017

CHECK-IN: 8:30AM

STUDIO TOUR: 9am – 4pm (12pm lunch break)
Limited seating for a tour of printmaking studios in Los Angeles.

 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2017

CHECK-IN: 8:30AM

WORKSHOP: 9am – 12pm (Requires RSVP)
Portraits for Printmaking Workshop
with Melanie Cervantes (Dignidad 
Rebelde)

WORKSHOP: 1pm – 4pm (Requires RSVP)
Serigraph Workshop
with Master Printer Malaquias Montoya

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2017

CHECK-IN: 8:30AM

OPEN PRINT STUDIO SESSION: 10am – 4pm (1pm lunch break)

PRINTMAKING SUMMIT DETAILS

STAFF
Joel Garcia, Director of Programs & Operations
Betty Avila, Associate Director
Alexa B. Kim, Program Coordinator

COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Poli Marichal, Master Printmaker
Dewey Tafoya, Artist in Residence
Miyo Stevens-Gandara, Artist Roundtable Member

CONTACT
info @ selfhelpgraphics.com | 323.881.6444